First encounters with French wildlife

I was meant to be taking an interest in a chateau – but something else had caught my eye. A large white and black butterfly was fluttering around which I’d never seen before. With a bit of fortune, I obtained a decent photo. I did some quick research and found it was a scarce swallowtail (which is a misnomer for France). The curious thing was that until I saw the photo, I was convinced that the head of the butterfly was at the other end – so maybe the coloration and stripiness was intentionally deceptive?

Scarce Swallowtail at La Guerche chateau.

I was amazed by how many butterflies we saw throughout the two weeks, many of which were new to me, including other new species like the Cleopatra and the White Admiral.

There were also lots of lizards. When we arrived in the small, picturesque town of Carennac, we parked on a roadside carpark which overlooked the River Dordogne. There was a wall which paralleled the road, on the top of which was a particularly obliging wall lizard, which didn’t seem to mind my putting the camera lens so close to its face. Perhaps it was used to lapping up the attention? We then found that we had parked illegally, so we had to depart swiftly!

Wall lizard at Carennac

During our week staying in Gramat, we took a walk from Lacave, choosing one which appeared to follow the line of the Ouysse river for much of it. We hadn’t reckoned on the scrubby line of trees along the river bank, though, which meant we had very few good views. On one of the few occasions when we found a significant gap in the trees, I went to the water’s edge and found myself eye-to-eye with a marsh frog!

Frog lounging in the river near Lacave

The birding was much more difficult than I had expected: possibly late August wasn’t a good time, and possibly I was going to the wrong areas: but even a dawn walk in a wooded area near Gramat was fairly futile. Towards the end of our stay, we went to the nature reserve at La Brenne, which is about 50 miles east of Châtellerault – and that made up for my previous attempts!

The first lake we went to, by the reserve’s centre, was full of egrets, which reminded me of the Somerset Levels. The second lake we went to, the Étang Ricot, seemed to have hardly any birds: until we saw a purple heron being chased off by a grey heron. As I’d only once seen a purple heron before, and that only briefly, this felt notable.

Jen then went off for a run (in the heat of the day – and it was hot!) while I went to the Terres de Renard. Another purple heron lurking distantly on the side of the lake, and I took many photos of it. Then another flew in much closer to the hide, providing much better and more dramatic opportunities.

Purple heron on the prowl – at La Brenne nature reserve

I watched it prowl around for a while and observed its similarity to the familiar grey heron – but thought it looked more slender and weaker than its cousin. How wrong I was!

After catching a couple of small fish and swallowing them whole, it then plunged after something much bigger.

Purple heron subduing its catch

When I saw what it had caught, I was astonished…

Purple heron with a huge catch

I was staggered by the size of its catch – it could have fed Jen and me for several meals! This one wasn’t for downing in one gulp, and having speared it successfully it strode off into the reeds to dismember its prey.

On the way to the final lake we went to, I saw a flurry of back-and-white wings and shouted ‘hoopoe’! Jen stopped the car and we watched it fly into a bush and then up to a telegraph wire. It looked like a great photo opportunity but, spying some food on the ground, it dropped down. Jen edged the car forward, then I used the passenger door as a hide, and just managed to control my excitement enough to secure a presentable photo.

Hoopoe near the La Brenne reserve

Throughout the day we saw plenty of coypu. They’re entertaining animals, not least in their being very visible and watchable – and I’d have been excited if these sightings weren’t tinged with the regret that they are an invasive species with detrimental consequences to the native ecology.

Coypu swimming at La Brenne

What’s not to like about a small furry animal washing itself – even if it is a coypu?

At our final stop, at the Étang Purais, we hoped to see squacco herons, which we’d been told were there. I looked out of one of the windows of the hide and saw none, and tried further round. Jen went to the first window and announced, “I’ve just seen a bittern there!”. Knowing that Jen can be a very alert observer without being expert, I said, “no you haven’t, you’ve just seen a squacco heron!” Indeed she had – the first time she’s seen a new species before I have! It’s intriguing seeing these birds acting like normal herons – except on a much smaller scale.

Squacco heron

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